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Fishing line selection weighty

Monofilament lines have come a long way too since first developed by DuPont in 1939 when the company invented nylon. But fishermen were not that impressed with the early mono and kept on using braided Dacron for the next several decades. My memory of early mono was that it was wiry and difficult to handle and cast. Its two saving graces - good knot strength and very low visibility to the fish - gave it a small but loyal following. In 1959 DuPont introduced Stren, a thinner and much softer monofilament line that could be used in a large range of reels, including newly introduced spinning and spin casting tackle. Stren's monofilament lines soon became a favorite with many fishermen because of its overall ease of use. A few years back, manufacturers started using polyvinylidene fluoride to make what we know now as fluorocarbon line. It is very much like nylon monofilament, but has several advantages: it is nearly invisible in water and stands up to sharp fish teeth and wear. Also, fluorocarbon doesn't take up water and it is resistant to UV-light. It is denser than nylon which makes it sink faster. A great choice for Lake Erie fishing. Dyneema, like polyvinylidene fluoride, is used in the new braided lines. It is stronger, much smaller in diameter and has very little stretch. So take care to adjust your reel's drag. An aggressive hook-set, without a light drag, will rip the hook out of the fish's mouth. Berkley Fireline is an innovation spun off Dyneema and I use it exclusively on all my reels. The big reason is size. For example, 6-pound test Fireline is the same diameter as 2-pound monofilament and will cast 30 to 40 percent farther than mono of the same pound test. I use the all-around useful 10-pound test. I like to tell charter clients it is so sensitive that I can feel the fish breathing on it. Honestly, the more I use it the more I believe it. Because Fireline is visible to the fish, I tip my lines with about six feet of 10-pound fluorocarbon, using a uni-knot. Fluorocarbon line is invisible in the water and fish can not see it. This feature alone will drastically increase your catch rate, especially in clear water conditions. In addition, fluorocarbon lines don't dissipate heat nearly as well as monofilament so go slow when tying the knot. Cinch it up quickly and it's likely to break from friction heat.
Picking the right fishing reel  It’s easy if you know what fish species you'll be going after. I'm lucky, I use the same rod and reels for bass, walleye and yellow perch. I prefer a spinning reel over the baitcaster. That is what I grew up with and that's what feels best in my hand. I also like the control it gives me when casting and fighting a fish. Most freshwater fishing is easily done with a spinning reel but what about size? How big or small of a reel should I purchase for my next trip to Lake Erie? Reel manufactures like to assign numbers to their products. The number usually denotes its size. The larger the number, the larger the reel. Look for reels with numbers such as 200, or 2000, 2500 or 3000 (my choice). These reels are prime sizes for most river and lake fishing. Larger reels such as 4000, 4500 or 5000 usually denote saltwater reels, made for 8, 9-foot rods for surf or pier fishing. There is one exception to this rule, I have found. And that is the size of the fisherman who will be using the reel. A large man with big hands might think a 2500 Shimano is too small to operate. Then obviously go with a larger reel. Price-wise, it is a jungle out there. Reels can cost anywhere from $10 up to the sky. I've never owned a really expensive reel and probably won't. I tend to stick in the $60-$120 range. When you pick up a reel read the information on the box. It will tell you a lot about what is inside. Reels with more stainless steel ball bearings will likely last longer, but cost more. But price and longevity go hand in hand. Buy a $60 reel and you might have to purchase one every two years. Buy a $120 reel and it might last four years. In the long run, the cost is the same. Generally, spool your reels with 8-12-pound test line.
walleye header
Don’t squint - say yes to polarized sunglasses Despite what you might hear about the weather in Northern Ohio we do have a lot of bright, sunny fishing days on Lake Erie.That's why I always encourage my customers to bring dark, polarized sunglasses with them on their charter. Without them, a fisherman likely will end the day with a gigantic headache caused by squinting all day. According to eye doctors, polarized lenses contain filters that reduce glare from reflected light. Thanks to the invasion of zebra mussels years ago the lake's water generally is pretty clear most of the time. So trust me when I say that the glare can be pretty intense. Doctors say non-polarized sunglasses only reduce the amount of light entering the eye without solving glare problems. Eliminating surface glare allows an angler's vision to penetrate the water and distinguish otherwise hidden objects such as the fish you may be attempting to coax into the net. That's a neat sight when you are bringing in a big fish. The same UV rays that cause sunburn can also inflict damage on the eye. High- quality, polarized optics offer more than mere respite for squinting eyes; they also provide protection from invisible hazards by blocking UV light.
illustration of various fishing lines

Trolling is a proven way of catching walleye

Just don’t get in the way of the captain and first mate when they are tending to their lines. Most Lake Erie charter boats will put out two lines for each fisherman onboard. In many cases this adds up to 16 so the odds of tangling lines are greatly increased. A ball of line is nearly impossible to untangle and it means downtime while the problem is resolved and lines are back in the water.   Many captains now days spool their reels with expensive braided line. If a good deal of it has to be pitched it’s like throwing money away. Usually,  customers will hear a short talk on trolling etiquette when they jump aboard:   A.) On a hookup let the first mate hand you the rod.  B.) Be polite and decide who is first up. C.) Don’t try to get your fish into the net in five seconds. Take your time and enjoy the fight. D.) Stay out of the first mate’s way as he works his lines. If he wants help he will ask for it. E.) Let the first mate or captain remove hooks from your fish. That’s their job. Don’t make it their job to remove it from your hand or leg. F.) But by all means keep an eye on rod tips for strikes and don’t be afraid to yell out “Fish On!”
Cold weather Lake Erie walleye
Whether its spring or fall, cold water fishing usually produces big walleyes.
Smallmouth from Lake Erie is measured
Besides walleye and perch, there are plenty of smallmouth bass in Lake Erie
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Lake Erie charters at Port Clinton and Vermilion, Ohio

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© Copyright site 2017 Mega Bites Charters. All rights reserved.

Fishing line selection

weighty

Monofilament lines have come a long way too since first developed by DuPont in 1939 when the company invented nylon. But fishermen were not that impressed with the early mono and kept on using braided Dacron for the next several decades. My memory of early mono was that it was wiry and difficult to handle and cast. Its two saving graces - good knot strength and very low visibility to the fish - gave it a small but loyal following. In 1959 DuPont introduced Stren, a thinner and much softer monofilament line that could be used in a large range of reels, including newly introduced spinning and spin casting tackle. Stren's monofilament lines soon became a favorite with many fishermen because of its overall ease of use. A few years back, manufacturers started using polyvinylidene fluoride to make what we know now as fluorocarbon line. It is very much like nylon monofilament, but has several advantages: it is nearly invisible in water and stands up to sharp fish teeth and wear. Also, fluorocarbon doesn't take up water and it is resistant to UV- light. It is denser than nylon which makes it sink faster. A great choice for Lake Erie fishing. Dyneema, like polyvinylidene fluoride, is used in the new braided lines. It is stronger, much smaller in diameter and has very little stretch. So take care to adjust your reel's drag. An aggressive hook- set, without a light drag, will rip the hook out of the fish's mouth. Berkley Fireline is an innovation spun off Dyneema and I use it exclusively on all my reels. The big reason is size. For example, 6- pound test Fireline is the same diameter as 2-pound monofilament and will cast 30 to 40 percent farther than mono of the same pound test. I use the all-around useful 10-pound test. I like to tell charter clients it is so sensitive that I can feel the fish breathing on it. Honestly, the more I use it the more I believe it. Because Fireline is visible to the fish, I tip my lines with about six feet of 10-pound fluorocarbon, using a uni-knot. Fluorocarbon line is invisible in the water and fish can not see it. This feature alone will drastically increase your catch rate, especially in clear water conditions. In addition, fluorocarbon lines don't dissipate heat nearly as well as monofilament so go slow when tying the knot. Cinch it up quickly and it's likely to break from friction heat.
Picking the right fishing reel  It’s easy if you know what fish species you'll be going after. I'm lucky, I use the same rod and reels for bass, walleye and yellow perch. I prefer a spinning reel over the baitcaster. That is what I grew up with and that's what feels best in my hand. I also like the control it gives me when casting and fighting a fish. Most freshwater fishing is easily done with a spinning reel but what about size? How big or small of a reel should I purchase for my next trip to Lake Erie? Reel manufactures like to assign numbers to their products. The number usually denotes its size. The larger the number, the larger the reel. Look for reels with numbers such as 200, or 2000, 2500 or 3000 (my choice). These reels are prime sizes for most river and lake fishing. Larger reels such as 4000, 4500 or 5000 usually denote saltwater reels, made for 8, 9-foot rods for surf or pier fishing. There is one exception to this rule, I have found. And that is the size of the fisherman who will be using the reel. A large man with big hands might think a 2500 Shimano is too small to operate. Then obviously go with a larger reel. Price-wise, it is a jungle out there. Reels can cost anywhere from $10 up to the sky. I've never owned a really expensive reel and probably won't. I tend to stick in the $60-$120 range. When you pick up a reel read the information on the box. It will tell you a lot about what is inside. Reels with more stainless steel ball bearings will likely last longer, but cost more. But price and longevity go hand in hand. Buy a $60 reel and you might have to purchase one every two years. Buy a $120 reel and it might last four years. In the long run, the cost is the same. Generally, spool your reels with 8-12-pound test line.